Advantages and Disadvantages of Lowfat Eating


lowfat eating

A lowfat diet is a form of restrictive dietary modification that omits or limits fats and oils in food. Foods generally considered acceptable include lean meat, fish, and poultry with the skin removed; fat-free dairy products such as milk, cheese, yoghurt, butter or sour cream; certain vegetables including sugar-snap peas and potatoes with skins on; hard candy containing no more than 1 gram of fat per piece; broth-based foods such as soups made without meat extracts or cream sauces. In contrast to the typical meal plan rich in carbohydrate content designed for diabetic patients – a lowfat meal provides about 40 grams of carbohydrates. Lowfat eatings are recommended by some health professionals for weight reduction due to their high carbohydrate content – which increases feelings of fullness.

The benefits of a lowfat eating plan

Lowfat Eating

The main benefit of a lowfat eating plan is that it will help you to lose weight, especially if combined with exercise. A well-balanced lowfat diet has been proven to reduce cholesterol and blood pressure in some people. It tends to improve triglyceride levels and high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”) cholesterol levels, which tend to be high in diabetics. The risk for coronary artery disease may also be lowered by following a lowfat diet. Eating less fat also makes it easier to maintain an appropriate body weight because restricted fat intake means you aren’t getting as many calories (energy). Lowfat diets can be prescribed for people who have been diagnosed with high blood cholesterol or triglycerides, diabetes, cancer of the breast, prostate or colon. Substituting healthy fats for unhealthy ones can also lead to a reduction in obesity.

The disadvantages of lowfat Eating

Lowfat Eating

Lowfat Eating means cutting back on some important food groups that provide us with essential nutrients necessary for our bodies to function properly. These include whole-grain products and legumes such as beans and lentils that provide fibre; lean red meat; nuts; seeds; poultry without skin that contain omega-3 fatty acids. Also it becomes harder to meet your daily nutrient needs when you cut back on fat. Additionally, following lowfat diets not designed by professionals may result in weight regain due to the restriction in calories. It may also cause loss of muscle mass along with fat loss, which is not healthy in itself since muscles help to increase metabolism and assist in weight management.

Science About Lowfat Dieting

A 2013 review article published in Current Atherosclerosis Reports noted that lowfat diets do not appear to improve health for people with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease or obesity. The authors reviewed many studies on this topic and found that although lowering fat intake did result in some small improvements among diabetics, there was no effect on lipid levels (cholesterol or triglycerides). A 2010 study published by JAMA Internal Medicine showed that a low-carbohydrate diet resulted in greater weight loss after 6 months, but at 12 months there was no significant difference in weight loss between a low-fat diet and a low-carbohydrate diet – suggesting that neither is better for long term weight control. A 2005 study published by the American Diabetes Association reported that an intensive lifestyle intervention program including a lowfat diet did not reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular events or death from cardiovascular disease among obese participants with type 2 diabetes after 4 years, compared to those who received standard care.

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